Brief intervention in primary care settings: A primary treatment method for at-risk, problem, and dependent drinkers

Michael Fleming*, Linda Baier Manwell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

130 Scopus citations

Abstract

Primary health care providers identify and treat many patients who are at risk for or are already experiencing alcohol-related problems. Brief interventions - counseling delivered by primary care providers in the context of several standard office visits - can be a successful treatment approach for many of these patients. Numerous trials involving a variety of patient populations have indicated that brief interventions can reduce patients' drinking levels, regardless of the patients' ages and gender. In clinical practice, brief interventions can help reduce the drinking levels of nondependent drinkers who drink more than the recommended limits, facilitate therapy and abstinence in patients receiving pharmacotherapy, and enhance the effectiveness of assessment and treatment referral in patients who do not respond to brief interventions alone. Despite the evidence for their usefulness, however, brief interventions for alcohol-related problems have not yet been widely implemented in primary care settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-137
Number of pages10
JournalAlcohol Research and Health
Volume23
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

Keywords

  • AOD abstinence
  • AOD dependence
  • AOD education
  • Amount of AOD use
  • Drug therapy
  • Intervention
  • Physician
  • Primary health care
  • Problematic AOD (alcohol and other drug) use
  • Psychological counseling
  • Risk factors
  • Treatment barriers
  • Treatment outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Brief intervention in primary care settings: A primary treatment method for at-risk, problem, and dependent drinkers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this