Brief report: The temporal relationships between sleep, cortisol, and lung functioning in youth with asthma

Margaret D. Hanson*, Edith Chen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: This study tested the directionality of the association between sleep and health outcomes in youth with asthma. Method: Thirty-eight youth with asthma (aged 9-19) completed a daily diary study on sleep, asthma symptoms, peak expiratory flow (PEF) measures, and salivary cortisol samples. Results: Greater quantity of sleep predicted lower PEF% [β(32)=-.33, p=.02], and lower daily cortisol output [β(33)=-.31, p=.07] the following day. Additionally, poorer self-reported sleep quality predicted more severe symptoms the next day [β(33)=.27, p=.05]. In contrast, PEF%, cortisol, and asthma symptoms did not significantly predict self-reported sleep quantity or quality the next night. Conclusions: Results suggest that sleep may affect subsequent health outcomes, rather than asthma impacting subsequent sleep, indicating the potential benefits of targeting sleep behaviors in youth with asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-316
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of pediatric psychology
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Cortisol
  • Sleep
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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