Brokerage-centrality conjugates for multi-level organizational field networks: Toward a blockchain implementation to enhance coordination of healthcare delivery

Kayo Fujimoto*, Camden J. Hallmark, Rebecca L. Mauldin, Jacky Kuo, Connor Smith, Natascha Del Vecchio, Lisa M. Kuhns, John A. Schneider, Peng Wang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

A fragmented U.S. healthcare delivery system may reflect a highly brokered communication network controlled by only a few brokers. Such relational inequality in brokerage influences the formation of interorganizational brokerage relations. This chapter presents the theoretical mechanisms that underlie the reasoning of instantiating organizational power dynamics in controlling communication (brokerage) while increasing connectivity (degree centrality); determining opportunities for accessing and exchanging resources across subgroups; and shaping organizational decisions and actions that are transformed collectively into locally centralized or decentralized brokerage structures, called 'brokerage-centrality conjugates.' These conjugates make up the interorganizational collaboration network of an organizational field, and is tested and supported by multi-level exponential random graph models. Finally, a blockchain-based network intervention is proposed to enhance interorganizational communication and coordination to improve population health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNetworks, Knowledge Brokers, and the Public Policymaking Process
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages265-314
Number of pages50
ISBN (Electronic)9783030787554
ISBN (Print)9783030787547
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 3 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Social Sciences
  • General Medicine

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