C-reactive protein, diastolic dysfunction, and risk of heart failure in patients with coronary disease: Heart and Soul Study

Eric S. Williams*, Sanjiv J. Shah, Sadia Ali, Bee Ya Na, Nelson B. Schiller, Mary A. Whooley

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker that predicts coronary heart disease (CHD) and, in recent studies, incident heart failure (HF). Whether the association of inflammation with incident HF is explained by worse baseline left ventricular dysfunction or by underlying CHD is unknown. Methods and results: Serum CRP was measured in a cohort of 985 outpatients with established CHD from the Heart and Soul Study. During 3 years of follow-up, 15% of the participants with elevated CRP levels (> 3 mg/L) were hospitalised for HF, compared with 7% of those with CRP ≤ 3 mg/L. In multivariate analysis, elevated CRP was associated with HF after adjustment for traditional risk factors, baseline CHD severity and interim MI (adjusted HR 2.1, 95% CI, 1.2-3.6; p = 0.009). However, elevated CRP was no longer associated with HF after further adjustment for the presence of diastolic dysfunction on echocardiography (adjusted HR 1.6, 95% CI, 0.8-3.2; p = 0.1). Conclusions: Among outpatients with stable CHD, elevated CRP levels predict hospitalisation for heart failure, independent of baseline heart failure, medication use, CHD severity, and subsequent MI events. This relationship appears to be at least partly explained by abnormal diastolic function in patients with elevated CRP levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-69
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Heart Failure
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Diastolic dysfunction
  • Echocardiography
  • Heart failure
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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