Calpain activation impairs neuromuscular transmission in a mouse model of the slow-channel myasthenic syndrome

Jason S. Groshong, Melissa J. Spencer, Bula J. Bhattacharyya, Elena Kudryashova, Bhupinder P.S. Vohra, Roberto Zayas, Robert L. Wollmann, Richard J. Miller, Christopher M. Gomez*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

The slow-channel myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is a hereditary disorder of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) that leads to prolonged AChR channel opening, Ca2+ overload, and degeneration of the NMJ. We used an SCS transgenic mouse model to investigate the role of the calcium-activated protease calpain in the pathogenesis of synaptic dysfunction in SCS. Cleavage of a fluorogenic calpain substrate was increased at the NMJ of dissociated muscle fibers. Inhibition of calpain using a calpastatin (CS) transgene improved strength and neuromuscular transmission. CS caused a 2-fold increase in the frequency of miniature endplate currents (MEPCs) and an increase in NMJ size, but MEPC amplitudes remained reduced. Persistent degeneration of the NMJ was associated with localized activation of the non-calpain protease caspase-3. This study suggests that calpain may act presynaptically to impair NMJ function in SCS but further reveals a role for other cysteine proteases whose inhibition may be of additional therapeutic benefit in SCS and other excitotoxic disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2903-2912
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume117
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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