Can pediatric bipolar-I disorder be diagnosed in the context of posttraumatic stress disorder? A familial risk analysis

Joseph Biederman*, Janet Wozniak, Mary Kate Martelon, Thomas J. Spencer, Yvonne Woodworth, Gagan Joshi, Andrea Spencer, Mai Uchida, Amelia Kotte, Stephen V. Faraone

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite ongoing concerns that traumatized children with severe symptoms of emotional dysregulation may be inappropriately receiving a diagnosis of pediatric bipolar-I (BP-I) disorder, this issue has not been adequately examined in the literature. Because both pediatric BP-I disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are familial disorders, if children with both BP-I and PTSD were to be truly affected with BP-I disorder, their relatives would be at high risk for BP-I disorder. To this end, we compared patterns of familial aggregation of BP-I disorder in BP-I children with and without PTSD with age and sex matched controls. Participants were 236 youths with BP-I disorder and 136 controls of both sexes along with their siblings. Participants completed a large battery of measures designed to assess psychiatric disorders, psychosocial, educational, and cognitive parameters. Familial risk analysis revealed that relatives of BP-I probands with and without PTSD had similar elevated rates of BP-I disorder that significantly differed from those of relatives of controls. Pediatric BP-I disorder is similarly highly familial in probands with and without PTSD indicating that their co-occurrence is not due to diagnostic error.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-224
Number of pages10
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume208
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 15 2002

Keywords

  • Clinical correlates
  • Comorbidity
  • Family risk analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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