Can robot-assisted therapy promote generalization of motor learning following stroke? Preliminary results

Heidi Fischer*, Leonard Kahn, Elisa Pelosin, Heidi Roth, Jason Barbas, W. Zev Rymer, David Reinkensmeyer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated whether robot-based training with a four degrees-of-freedom actuated device, the ARM Guide, would result in significant gains in arm movement ability of stroke survivors. Specifically, we sought to determine if specific trained tasks in a limited area of the workspace would transfer to gains in performance of different tasks and movement in untrained regions of the workspace. Subjects with chronic hemiparesis participated in an eight week training protocol and were randomized into one of three training groups: guided force training with the robotic device (N=7), free reaching (N=7), and a conventional occupational therapy group (N=7). Outcome measures include free reaching distance and observations of functional task performance from three clinical scales. Results indicated that all three training methods induced at least some transferable motor learning demonstrated in the functional tasks and in free reaching to a target that was outside of the trained workspace. We report here on our interm findings regarding the generalization of robot-assisted learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the First IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, 2006, BioRob 2006
Pages865-868
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 22 2006
Event1st IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, 2006, BioRob 2006 - Pisa, Italy
Duration: Feb 20 2006Feb 22 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the First IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, 2006, BioRob 2006
Volume2006

Other

Other1st IEEE/RAS-EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, 2006, BioRob 2006
CountryItaly
CityPisa
Period2/20/062/22/06

Keywords

  • Motor learning
  • Rehabilitation
  • Robotics
  • Stroke
  • Upper extremity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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