Capital punishment in illinois in the aftermath of the Ryan commutations: Reforms, economic realities, and a new saliency for issues of cost

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    6 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Perhaps most telling is the view of Professor Joseph Hoffman, someone who has devoted enormous time and energy to death penalty reform, spearheading death penalty reform efforts in both Illinois and Indiana and serving as Co-Chair and Reporter for the Massachusetts Governor's Council on Capital Punishment. Hoffman served as a member of an advisory group to discuss an earlier draft of this paper, and he strongly expressed the view that seeking reform of capital punishment in the political realm is futile. This is a striking position to take by one who is not morally opposed to the death penalty and who has worked on numerous reform projects. But Hoffman cited as grounds for his change of heart the example of Illinois, in which there were confirmed wrongful convictions in capital cases, a sympathetic Governor, and a bi-partisan reform commission, but still strong resistance in the state legislature to reforms specifically targeted at capital punishment. In short, serious concerns about efficacy in the political realm militate against the undertaking of a new reform effort by the Institute.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1301-1402
    Number of pages102
    JournalJournal of Criminal Law and Criminology
    Volume100
    Issue number4
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Law

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