Cardiac and neurologic complications identify risks for mortality for both men and women undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

Charles W. Hogue, Thoralf Sundt, Benico Barzilai, Kenneth B. Schecthman, Victor G. Dávila-Román

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Despite a number of studies showing that women and men respond to coronary artery bypass graft surgery differently, it is not known whether variables associated with mortality are the same for women and men. The purpose of this study was to identify variables independently associated with mortality for women undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods: Single-institutional data were prospectively collected from 5,113 patients (1,558 or 30.5% women) undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The database was reviewed for patient characteristics and operative outcomes based on sex. Complications evaluated included low cardiac output syndrome (cardiac index < 2.0 1 · min-1 · min-2 for > 8 h, regardless of treatment), stroke (new permanent global or focal motor deficits), Q-wave myocardial infarction, postoperative atrial fibrillation, and operative mortality. Results: Women were older than men, and they were more likely to have preexisting hypertension, diabetes, and a history of stroke. Operative mortality for women was higher than for men (3.5% vs. 2.5%, P < 0.05). Compared with men, women were more likely to experience a postoperative myocardial infarction, stroke, and low cardiac output syndrome. When performing analysis on data from both sexes separately, low cardiac output syndrome, new stroke, myocardial infarction, and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass were independently associated with mortality for women and men both. Patient age was not independently associated with risk for mortality for women, but it was for men. However, when the authors combined both sexes in the logistic regression analysis, the age-sex interaction was not significant (P = 0.266), indicating that there was insufficient evidence to assert that age has a different effect on mortality for men and women. Conclusions: These data confirm that women have higher perioperative mortality after coronary artery bypass graft surgery compared with men. A higher frequency of cardiac and neurologic complications seem to account to a large extent for the higher operative mortality for women. Factors independently associated with perioperative mortality are generally similar for women and men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1074-1078
Number of pages5
JournalAnesthesiology
Volume95
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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