Case study: Use of the dynamic movement orthosis to provide compressive shoulder support for children with brachial plexus palsy

Audrey Yasukawa*, Patricia Martin, Arthur Guilford, Shubhra Mukherjee

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy often present with shoulder alignment issues. Shoulder subluxation may occur as a result of shoulder girdle muscle weakness and overstretching of the ligamentous support structure around the glenohumeral joint. Optimal alignment and support of the glenohumeral joint is essential for active functional shoulder movement and distal control. Shoulder support options are limited for children, because materials may not be suitable for daily wear and compliance is often poor. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a custom-fitted shoulder orthosis, the Dynamic Movement Orthosis (DMO), and its ability to support and improve upper limb function during active wear. The Wolf Motor Function Test assesses 17 tasks (2 strength based, measured by weight lifted and grip, and 15 function based, measured using time to completion). This test was used to objectively quantify active shoulder and elbow movements with and without the use of a custom-fitted DMO. This case study suggests that the DMO supported the shoulder during functional task and optimized active strength distally in the wrist and elbow.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-164
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Prosthetics and Orthotics
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • brachial plexus palsy
  • obstetric brachial plexus palsy
  • shoulder brace
  • shoulder orthosis
  • shoulder subluxation
  • shoulder weakness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation

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