Catastrophe and stability analysis of a cable-driven actuator

James S. Sulzer*, Michael A. Peshkin, James L. Patton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent work in human-robot interaction has revealed the need for compliant, human-friendly devices. One such device, known as the MARIONET, is a cable-driven single joint actuator with the intended applications of physical rehabilitation and assistive devices. In this work, the stability of the nonlinear system is determined in regards to its equilibria in a wide variety of configurations. In certain configurations, the canonical version of this mechanism experiences an interesting mathematical behavior known as "catastrophes". This behavior may be disadvantageous toward control or even safety. Several cases are thoroughly investigated, two cases where each of two degrees of freedom loses control, and the final case explores the use of a mechanical advantage such as a block and tackle. The study concludes that for a range of design options, the MARIONET does not suffer from any catastrophes. However, the unique behaviors such as a unidirectional bifurcation produced by certain configurations may have use outside of our objectives, perhaps as a type of switch or valve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
Pages2429-2433
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Aug 30 2006Sep 3 2006

Publication series

NameAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
ISSN (Print)0589-1019

Other

Other28th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS'06
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period8/30/069/3/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Catastrophe and stability analysis of a cable-driven actuator'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this