Catastrophizing and Pain-Contingent Rest Predict Patient Adjustment in Men With Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

Dean A. Tripp*, J. Curtis Nickel, Yanlin Wang, Mark S. Litwin, Mary McNaughton-Collins, J. Richard Landis, Richard B. Alexander, Anthony J. Schaeffer, Michael P. O'Leary, Michel A. Pontari, Jackson E. Fowler, Leroy M. Nyberg, John W. Kusek

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

92 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cognitive/behavioral and environmental variables are significant predictors of patient adjustment in chronic pain. Using a biopsychosocial template and selecting several pain-relevant constructs from physical, cognitive/behavioral, and environmental predictors, outcomes of pain and disability in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) were explored. Men (n = 253) from a North American multi-institutional NIH-funded Chronic Prostatitis Cohort Study in 6 US and 1 Canadian centers participated in a survey examining pain and disability. Measures included demographics, urinary symptoms, depression, pain, disability, catastrophizing, control over pain, pain-contingent rest, social support, and solicitous responses from a significant other. Regressions showed that urinary symptoms (β = .20), depression (β = .24), and helplessness catastrophizing (β = .29) predicted overall pain. Further, affective pain was predicted by depression (β = .39) and helplessness catastrophizing (β = .44), whereas sensory pain was predicted by urinary symptoms (β = .25) and helplessness catastrophizing (β = .37). With regard to disability, urinary symptoms (β = .17), pain (β = .21), and pain-contingent rest (β = .33) were the predictors. These results suggest cognitive/behavioral variables (ie, catastrophizing, pain-contingent rest) may have significant impact on patient adjustment in CP/CPPS. Findings support the need for greater research of such pain-related variables in CP/CPPS. Perspective: This article explores predictors of patient adjustment in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). Cognitive/behavioral variables of catastrophizing and pain-contingent rest respectively predicted greater pain and disability. Catastrophic helplessness was a prominent pain predictor. These findings inform clinicians and researchers on several new variables in CP/CPPS outcomes and suggest future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)697-708
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Keywords

  • Chronic prostatitis
  • adjustment
  • catastrophizing
  • pain-contingent resting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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