Cationic residues in pathogenic anti‐DNA autoantibodies arise by mutations of a germ‐line gene that belongs to a large VH gene subfamily

Theresa L. O'Keefe, Syamal K. Datta, Thereza Imanishi‐Kari*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

The F1 progeny of autoimmune NZB and normal SWR mice uniformly develop severe and accelerated lupus nephritis. The (SWR × NZB)F1 mice produce an oligoclonally expanded population of nephritogenic anti‐DNA autoantibodies that share a recurrent cross‐reactive idiotype (Id564), use highly homologous VH genes and surprisingly have the CH region allotype of the normal SWR parent. From extensive library analyses, we isolated 15 SWR germ‐line genes which are most closely related to the pathogenic autoantibody VH564 gene and which also belong to the NPb subfamily of J558 VH genes. We found that the pathogenic VH genes are probably somatic variants of a SWR germ‐line VH gene, SW6—3, and they have several basic amino acid substitutions, in addition to those already present in the SW6—3 germ‐line gene. Since these pathogenic autoantibodies are not detectable in the sera of the normal SWR mice despite the presence of the SW6—3 gene, strong selection and expansion of B cells expressing the SW6—3 VH gene is probably occurring in (SWR × NZB)F1 lupus‐prone mice. We also isolated eight germ‐line genes from the NZB mouse which are homologous to SW6—3. The autoimmune NZB parent that rarely develops nephritis lacks the SW6—3 gene, but has several highly homologous germ‐line VH genes that would encode less cationic antibodies. These results establish a correlation between structure and pathogenic potential of VH genes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)619-624
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Immunology
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cationic residues in pathogenic anti‐DNA autoantibodies arise by mutations of a germ‐line gene that belongs to a large V<sub>H</sub> gene subfamily'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this