Cautionary findings for motor evoked potential monitoring in intracranial aneurysm surgery after a single administration of rocuronium to facilitate tracheal intubation

Hironobu Hayashi, John F. Bebawy, Antoun Koht, Laura B Hemmer*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Administration of rocuronium to facilitate intubation has traditionally been regarded as acceptable for intraoperative motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring because of sufficiently rapid spontaneous neuromuscular blockade recovery. We hypothesized that residual neuromuscular blockade, in an amount that could hinder optimal neuromonitoring in patients undergoing intracranial aneurysm clipping, was still present at dural opening. We sought to identify how often this was occurring and to identify factors which may contribute to prolonged blockade. Records of 97 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Rocuronium was administered to facilitate intubation with no additional neuromuscular blockade given. Prolonged spontaneous recovery time to a train-of-four (TOF) ratio of 0.75 after rocuronium administration was defined as 120 min, which was approximately when dural opening and the setting of baseline MEPs were occurring. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors related to prolonged spontaneous recovery time. Prolonged spontaneous recovery time to a TOF ratio of 0.75 was observed in 44.3% of patients. Multivariable analysis showed that only the dosage of rocuronium based on ideal body weight had a positive correlation with prolonged spontaneous recovery time (P = 0.01). There was no significant association between dosage of rocuronium based on total body weight, age, sex, or body temperature and prolonged recovery time. This study demonstrates that the duration of relaxation for MEP monitoring purposes is well-beyond the routinely recognized clinical duration of rocuronium. Residual neuromuscular blockade could result in lower amplitude MEP signals and/or lead to higher required MEP stimulus intensities which can both compromise monitoring sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Intracranial aneurysm surgery
  • Motor evoked potential
  • Neurophysiological monitoring
  • Rocuronium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cautionary findings for motor evoked potential monitoring in intracranial aneurysm surgery after a single administration of rocuronium to facilitate tracheal intubation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this