“Celebrity 2.0 and beyond!” Effects of Facebook profile sources on social networking advertising

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23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two experiments examined the effects of different sources (celebrity versus peer consumer) of celebrity-brand-related user-generated content (UGC) embedded in a social networking site (SNS). Consistent with the basic premises of warranting theory (stronger effects of other-endorsement than self-endorsement) and social identity theory (more positive effects of ingroup than outgroup), Experiment 1 demonstrated more positive effects of celebrity brand endorsements posted on a peer consumer's (other; in-group identity) Facebook profile page on source credibility perception and parasocial interaction with the celebrity than celebrity brand endorsements posted on the celebrity's own (self; out-group identity) Facebook profile page. Social identification mediated the effects of the Facebook profile source on parasocial interaction with the celebrity. Experiment 2 indicated that a movie star's Facebook presence contributed to a more positive attitude toward the celebrity. A peer Facebook user's movie endorsement UGC resulted in greater advertising believability, more positive attitude toward, and more positive emotional reactions toward system-generated content (SGC) sponsored Facebook advertising than the movie star's self-promotion on his own Facebook page. In addition, movie involvement moderated the relationship between the Facebook profile source and advertising effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-168
Number of pages15
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume79
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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Keywords

  • Celebrity brand endorsements
  • Facebook likes & comments
  • Integrated marketing communication (IMC)
  • Parasocial interaction (PSI)
  • Social identity theory (SIT)
  • Social media marketing
  • User-generated content (UGC)
  • Warranting theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

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