Cell-Free Synthesis Goes Electric: Dual Optical and Electronic Biosensor via Direct Channel Integration into a Supported Membrane Electrode

Zachary A. Manzer, Surajit Ghosh, Arpita Roy, Miranda L. Jacobs, Juliana Carten, Neha P. Kamat, Susan Daniel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Assembling transmembrane proteins on organic electronic materials is one promising approach to couple biological functions to electrical readouts. A biosensing device produced in such a way would enable both the monitoring and regulation of physiological processes and the development of new analytical tools to identify drug targets and new protein functionalities. While transmembrane proteins can be interfaced with bioelectronics through supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), incorporating functional and oriented transmembrane proteins into these structures remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that cell-free expression systems allow for the one-step integration of an ion channel into SLBs assembled on an organic conducting polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). Using the large conductance mechanosensitive channel (MscL) as a model ion channel, we demonstrate that MscL adopts the correct orientation, remains mobile in the SLB, and is active on the polyelectrolyte surface using optical and electrical readouts. This work serves as an important illustration of a rapidly assembled bioelectronic platform with a diverse array of downstream applications, including electrochemical sensing, physiological regulation, and screening of transmembrane protein modulators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)502-510
Number of pages9
JournalACS synthetic biology
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2023

Keywords

  • bioelectronic
  • cell-free protein synthesis
  • dual-readout
  • membrane protein
  • supported lipid bilayer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Biomedical Engineering

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