Cell Surface Expression of GluR5 Kainate Receptors is Regulated by an Endoplasmic Reticulum Retention Signal

Zhao Ren, Nathan J. Riley, Leigh A. Needleman, James M. Sanders, Geoffrey T. Swanson, John Marshall*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Kainate receptors (KARs) are mediators of excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system, and their efficient targeting and trafficking is critical for normal synaptic function. A key step in the delivery of KARs to the neuronal plasma membrane is the exit of newly assembled receptors from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Here we report the identification of a novel ER retention signal in the alternatively spliced C-terminal domain of the GluR5-2b subunit, which controls receptor trafficking in both heterologous cells and neurons. The ER retention motif consists of a critical arginine (Arg-896) and surrounding amino acids, disruption of which promotes ER exit and surface expression of the receptors, as well as altering their physiological properties. The Arg-896-mediated ER retention of GluR5 is regulated by a mutation that mimics phosphorylation of Thr-898, but not by PDZ interactions. Furthermore, two positively charged residues (Arg-900 and Lys-901) in the C terminus were also found to regulate ER export of the receptors. Taken together, our results identify novel trafficking signals in the C-terminal domain of GluR5-2b and demonstrate that alternative splicing is an important mechanism regulating KAR function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52700-52709
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume278
Issue number52
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 26 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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