Cerebellar theta and beta noninvasive stimulation rhythms differentially influence episodic memory versus semantic prediction

Shruti Dave*, Stephen VanHaerents, Joel L. Voss

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The human cerebellum is thought to interact with distributed brain networks to support cognitive abilities such as episodic memory and semantic prediction. Hippocampal and fronto-temporo-parietal networks that respectively support episodic memory versus semantic prediction have been associated with distinct endogenous oscillatory activity frequency bands: theta (;3–8 Hz) versus beta (;13–30 Hz) respectively. We sought to test whether it is possible to toggle cerebellar participation in episodic memory versus semantic prediction by noninvasively stimulating with theta versus beta rhythmic transcranial magnetic stimulation. In human subjects of both sexes, cerebellar theta stimulation improved episodic memory encoding but did not influence neural signals of semantic prediction, whereas beta stimulation of the same cerebellar location increased neural signals of semantic prediction but did not influence episodic memory encoding. This constitutes evidence for double dissociation of cerebellar contributions to semantic prediction versus episodic memory based on stimulation rhythm, supporting the hypothesis that the cerebellum can be biased to support these distinct cognitive abilities at the command of network-specific rhythmic activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7300-7310
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume40
Issue number38
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2020

Keywords

  • Beta frequency
  • EEG
  • Episodic memory
  • Language processing
  • Theta frequency
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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