Cerebral mycosis: 7-year retrospective series in a tertiary center

Kirtee Raparia, Suzanne Z. Powell, Pat Cernoch, Hidehiro Takei*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study focuses on the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, risk factors, diagnosis and outcome of all cases of central nervous system (CNS) fungal infections in a tertiary center. Medical records of 18 patients of culture-proven CNS fungal infections were retrospectively reviewed from 2000 to 2007, including 12 isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and seven from tissue biopsy. Patient demographic data included 10 males and eight females. The mean age was 55 years (range: 24-89 years). All but one patient were immunocompromised. Fungal organisms isolated from CSF included: Cryptococcous neoformans (8 patients), Coccidioides immitis (3 patients), and Aspergillus versicolor (1 patient). Histopathology of seven biopsy cases revealed groups of pigmented golden-brown fungal forms in three cases; three cases showed septate fungi, two of which had melanin in their walls; and one case showed multiple round spherules. These cases on microbiological cultures grew Coccidioides immitis (1 patient), Aspergillus fumigatus (1 patient), Cladophialophora bantiana (2 patients), Fonsecaea monophora (1 patient) and Scedosporium apiospermum (2 patients). Five of the seven fungal organisms isolated from tissue biopsies were dematiaceous fungi. Twelve patients died after a period of a few weeks to months, two were lost to follow-up, and four are alive with severe neurological sequelae. CNS fungal infections in our cohort were more common in patients post-transplant and with hematologic malignancies. In our series, rare dematiaceous fungi are emerging agents for cerebral mycosis. The outcome of CNS fungal infections is poor despite vigorous antifungal therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-223
Number of pages6
JournalNeuropathology
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

Keywords

  • Central nervous system
  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • Dematiaceous fungi
  • Immunocompromised host
  • Mycosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

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