Changes in Gatekeeper Beliefs Following ASIST and Relation to Subsequent Gatekeeper Suicide Prevention Behaviors

Christina S. Magness*, Karlin Stern, Amanda Burnside, Devyn Masterson, Seth Finkelstein, Anne Kramer, Patricia K. Smith, Cynthia J.Ewell Foster

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines relations between suicide prevention gatekeeper beliefs and actual helping behaviors following participation in Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST). Participants (n = 434) completed measures examining suicide-related beliefs and behaviors using a naturalistic pre-post design. All beliefs demonstrated significant change from pre- to posttest. Regression analyses indicate that beliefs about perceived barriers to action and the controllability of suicide predicted identification of high-risk youth; perceived barriers to action were also negatively related to helping responses and referrals 6–9 months post training. Self-efficacy was not related to suicide prevention behaviors at follow-up. The importance of anchoring training curriculums and measurement to health behavior change theories is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1013-1020
Number of pages8
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2023

Keywords

  • ASIST
  • Gatekeeper training
  • Health behavior change
  • Suicide prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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