Characterization of a highly fouling fraction of algogenic organic matter in low- and high-pressure membrane filtration

David A. Ladner*, John A. Jurevis, Derek R. Vardon, Mark M. Clark

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Algal blooms cause membrane fouling in seawater desalination. High-pressure reverse osmosis (RO) membranes are affected by algogenic organic matter (AOM) that passes through pretreatment. When the pretreatment technology is low-pressure microfiltration (MF) or ultrafiltration (UF), it is severely fouled by AOM and algal cells. AOM is heterogeneous in size because algae are broken apart during natural cell lysis or by shear in pumps and valves. The main hypothesis of this work is that a certain size class of AOM is the most highly fouling. Bench-scale experiments revealed that in both high-pressure and low-pressure filtration, particulate AOM between 0.22 and 2 μm in size tends to be the highly fouling fraction on the membranes currently employed in most applications. Adsorption of biopolymers had little fouling potential when particulate material was not present. 2009

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2009
Pages1031-1040
Number of pages10
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
EventWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2009 - Seattle, WA, United States
Duration: Nov 15 2009Nov 19 2009

Publication series

NameWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2009

Other

OtherWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle, WA
Period11/15/0911/19/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Water Science and Technology

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