Charity-based incentives motivate young adult cancer survivors to increase physical activity: a pilot randomized clinical trial

Sarah Kozey Keadle*, Leah Meuter, Suzanne Phelan, Siobhan M. Phillips

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To determine the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of an eHealth intervention with charity-based incentives to increase physical activity (PA) among young adult cancer survivors. Participants were randomized into two groups: PA (N = 25; Fitbit, step goal, electronic weekly newsletter) or PA + Charity (N = 26; same as PA plus charity donation if step goal achieved). At baseline and 12 weeks, steps/day were assessed using an activPAL. Motivation (e.g., BREQ-3) and patient reported outcomes (e.g., sleep quality, fatigue) were self-reported. The mean age was 36.8 years, 56.9% were Non-Hispanic White. We retained 82% (42/51) of participants. The PA + Charity vs. PA group had significantly higher satisfaction with intervention experience (100% vs 85%), greater increases in steps/day (1689 vs 516) and increases in overall self-determination score (13.5 vs 2.2). Both groups significantly improved sleep quality and reduced fatigue. A low-intensity eHealth intervention with charity-based incentives was feasible, acceptable, increased PA and self-determination. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT03322059.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Behavioral intervention
  • Cancer survivor
  • Financial incentives
  • Physical activity
  • Steps
  • Young adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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