Child Protective Intervention in the Context of Welfare Reform: The Effects of Work and Welfare on Maltreatment Reports

Kristen Shook Slack*, Jane Louise Holl, Bong Joo Lee, Marla McDaniel, Lisa Altenbernd, Amy Bush Stevens

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent changes in welfare policy have produced changes in parental work and welfare receipt. These factors are assessed in relation to investigated reports of child abuse and neglect using survey data on 1998 welfare recipients in nine Illinois counties, in conjunction with longitudinal administrative data on cash welfare benefits, employment, and child abuse and neglect reports. Trend analyses show that rates of child maltreatment reports among welfare recipients have risen since the passage of PRWORA in 1996. Findings from multivariate analyses indicate that parental employment has a protective effect on reports to child protection systems (CPS), that this effect is greatest when combined with welfare receipt, and that this effect becomes stronger over time. Those who receive welfare in the absence of employment face a significantly greater risk of CPS involvement, even compared with those who neither work nor receive welfare.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-536
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Policy Analysis and Management
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

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