Choice and self: How synchronic and diachronic identity shape choices and decision making

Oleg Urminsky*, Daniel M. Bartels, Paola Giuliano, George E. Newman, Stefano Puntoni, Lance Rips

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research on the role of identity in choice varies widely across fields like psychology, philosophy, consumer behavior, and economics, in both the key questions addressed and the methods of investigation. Although a large literature has established how salient aspects of identity affect attitudes and norms, less is known about how beliefs concerning identity are shaped and how these beliefs affect decision making. In this review, we cover recent insights into these issues and summarize some newer, developing approaches to understanding (i) how people judge the persistence of identity, (ii) how beliefs about future changes in identity are formed and how they affect choices, (iii) the formation of beliefs about future changes in identity and how these beliefs affect decisions, and (iv) the historical and economic antecedents of identity norms and their consequences for economic behavior. We introduce a distinction between synchronic and diachronic approaches, and highlight important unresolved questions that will help these fields to more fully understand the role that identity plays in shaping choices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-291
Number of pages11
JournalMarketing Letters
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

Keywords

  • Decision-making
  • Personal identity
  • Social identity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Marketing

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