Chronic kidney disease and upper tract concerns after congenital and acquired urinary tract abnormalities: considerations for transition of care in teens and young adults

Elizabeth B Yerkes*, Michelle Baum, David I. Chu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To emphasize the burden that chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its complications place on overall health and well-being over the lifetime in individuals with congenital and acquired urinary tract abnormalities. Methods: Topic-based literature review was performed and professional opinion was obtained to describe the scope of medical challenges faced by both teens and adults and their health care providers in the context of congenital and acquired urinary tract abnormalities. Results: Challenges include accurate assessment of glomerular filtration rate; engaging for consistent surveillance of blood pressure, proteinuria, and medical complications of CKD that increase the risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and affect general health; achieving early referral to nephrology for better outcomes; managing renal complications within the unique limitations of lower urinary tract function; treating upper tract urolithiasis in the atypical urinary tract; and preparing for successful renal transplant. Conclusion: In individuals with congenital or acquired abnormalities of the urinary tract, there is an inherent risk of CKD with its associated morbidity and increased mortality risk. Interplay between the upper and lower urinary tract impacts CKD progression. Collaborative management between urology and nephrology is highly recommended to address the unique challenges for each individual over the lifetime.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWorld journal of urology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Congenital anomaly
  • Metabolic acidosis
  • Proteinuria
  • Renal anomaly
  • Transition of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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