Chronic postherniorrhaphy pain following inguinal hernia surgery: Etiology, risk factors, anatomy, and treatment options

David R. Walega*, Brian Chung

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite recent advances in surgical technique for inguinal hernia repair, chronic groin pain following the surgical repair of an inguinal hernia is not uncommon. Injury to the ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, or genitofemoral nerves is the most common etiology. Specific risk factors that increase the likelihood of developing chronic groin pain have been identified. Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks may play an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic groin pain. As in many pain syndromes, early diagnosis and early treatment are crucial. Evidence-based management of chronic groin pain is poorly studied, although cryotherapy and neuromodulation techniques show potential efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-109
Number of pages6
JournalTechniques in Regional Anesthesia and Pain Management
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Genitofemoral neuralgia
  • Iliohypogastric neuralgia
  • Ilioinguinal neuralgia
  • Inguinal pain
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Postherniorrhaphy pain
  • Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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