Cingulate gyrus neuroanatomy in schizophrenia subjects and their non-psychotic siblings

Daniel R. Calabrese, Lei Wang, Michael P. Harms, J. Tilak Ratnanather, Deanna M. Barch, C. Robert Cloninger, Paul A. Thompson, Michael I. Miller, John G. Csernansky*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and methods: In vivo neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of decreases in the gray matter volume of the cingulate gyrus in subjects with schizophrenia as compared to healthy controls. To investigate whether these changes might be related to heritable influences, we used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and labeled cortical mantle distance mapping to measure gray matter volume, as well as thickness and the area of the gray/white interface, in the anterior and posterior segments of the cingulate gyrus in 28 subjects with schizophrenia and their non-psychotic siblings, and in 38 healthy control subjects and their siblings. Results: There was a significant effect of group status on posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) gray matter volume (p = 0.02). Subjects with schizophrenia and their non-psychotic siblings showed similar reductions of gray matter volume (~ 10%) in the PCC compared to healthy control subjects and their siblings. In turn, trend level effects of group status were found for thickness (p = 0.08) and surface area (p = 0.11) of the PCC. In the combined group of schizophrenia subjects and their siblings, a direct correlation was observed between PCC gray matter volume and negative symptoms. However, the reduction in PCC gray matter volume in schizophrenia subjects and their siblings was proportionate to an overall reduction in whole cerebral volume, i.e., the effect of group on the volume of the PCC became non-significant when cerebral volume was included as a covariate (p = 0.4). There was no significant effect of group on anterior cingulate cortex volume, thickness, or area. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that decreases in the gray matter volume of the PCC occur in schizophrenia subjects and their siblings. The presence of such decreases in the non-psychotic siblings of schizophrenia subjects suggests that heritable factors may be involved in the development of cortical abnormalities in schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-70
Number of pages10
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume104
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

Keywords

  • Cingulated
  • Cortex
  • Depth mapping
  • Schizophrenia
  • Sibling
  • Thickness
  • Volume

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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