Classification of Perceived Human Stress using Physiological Signals

Aamir Arsalan, Muhammad Majid, Syed Muhammad Anwar, Ulas Bagci

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, we present an experimental study for the classification of perceived human stress using non-invasive physiological signals. These include electroencephalography (EEG), galvanic skin response (GSR), and photoplethysmography (PPG). We conducted experiments consisting of steps including data acquisition, feature extraction, and perceived human stress classification. The physiological data of 28 participants are acquired in an open eye condition for a duration of three minutes. Four different features are extracted in time domain from EEG, GSR and PPG signals and classification is performed using multiple classifiers including support vector machine, the Naive Bayes, and multi-layer perceptron (MLP). The best classification accuracy of 75% is achieved by using MLP classifier. Our experimental results have shown that our proposed scheme outperforms existing perceived stress classification methods, where no stress inducers are used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2019 41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2019
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1247-1250
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781538613115
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019
Externally publishedYes
Event41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2019 - Berlin, Germany
Duration: Jul 23 2019Jul 27 2019

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS
ISSN (Print)1557-170X

Conference

Conference41st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2019
CountryGermany
CityBerlin
Period7/23/197/27/19

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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