Clinical Characteristics Associated with Reduced Selective Voluntary Motor Control in the Upper Extremity of Individuals with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Selective voluntary motor control (SVMC) in the upper extremity is often impaired in individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and can be assessed quantitatively and qualitatively using the Test of Arm Selective Control (TASC). Methods: Fifty-six individuals with spastic CP (5–18 years old) were included. Descriptors associated with administration of the TASC were analyzed according to the type of CP and arm joint using Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. ABILHAND-Kids scores were compared between participants with and without mirror movements using a t-test. Results: All groups of children with spastic CP had incidence of TASC movement descriptors. There was a main effect of topography of CP on extra movements, decreased active range of motion, tightness, spasticity, and mirroring, and an additional main effect of joint on mirroring. Participants with mirroring had lower ABILHAND-Kids scores than those without mirroring. Conclusions: Systematically observing arm movements using the TASC revealed differences across participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopmental Neurorehabilitation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • arm
  • cerebral palsy
  • mirror movements
  • motor control
  • Selective voluntary motor control
  • synergy
  • TASC
  • test of arm Selective Control
  • upper extremity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Rehabilitation
  • Developmental Neuroscience

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