Clinical impact of ex vivo differentiated myeloid precursors after high-dose chemotherapy and peripheral blood progenitor cell rescue

T. M. Zimmerman*, W. J. Lee, J. G. Bender, M. Schilling, S. L. Smith, D. E. Van Epps, S. F. Williams

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The infusion of ex vivo differentiated myeloid precursors may be able to shorten the period of obligatory neutropenia after high-dose chemotherapy and peripheral blood progenitor cell rescue by providing cells capable of differentiating to mature neutrophils within days of infusion. To test this hypothesis, 21 female patients with metastatic breast cancer underwent progenitor cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide, etoposide and G-CSF. CD34+ cells from one to two leukapheresis products were isolated and placed in suspension culture with a serum-free growth medium supplemented with PIXY321. The cultures were maintained for 12 days with subcultures initiated on day 7. The remaining leukapheresis products were cryopreserved in an unmanipulated state. Forty-eight hours after completing high-dose cyclophosphamide, thiotepa and carboplatin, the cryopreserved progenitors were infused, followed 1 to 24 h later by infusion of the differentiated myeloid precursors. In one patient, the cultured cells were labeled with Indium-111 with nuclear imaging performed up to 48 h post infusion. The differentiated myeloid precursors were suitable for infusion in 17 of the patients with a median 13-fold expansion of total nucleated cells. A range of 5.6 to 1066 x 107 nucleated cells were infused. Morphologically the cells were predominantly of myeloid lineage (63%) with a median 41% of the cells expressing CD15. No untoward effects were noted with the infusion of the cultured cells. The median days to neutrophil and platelet recovery were 8 and 10 days, respectively. There was a significant relationship (r = 0.67, P = 0.007) between the dose of differentiated myeloid precursors (CD15+ cells) and the depth and duration of neutropenia; a similar relationship, however, was also observed with the dose of cryopreserved CD34+ cells. After infusion of the radiolabeled myeloid precursors, a pattern of distribution similar to radio-labeled granulocytes was noted with uptake detected initially in the lungs and subsequently the reticulo-endothelial system. The impact of differentiated myeloid precursors on neutropenia as an adjunct to high-dose chemotherapy and peripheral blood progenitor cell rescue remains unclear from this study. Further study with controlled doses of cryopreserved progenitors and escalating doses of differentiated myeloid precursors is required.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-510
Number of pages6
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autologous transplantation
  • Breast cancer
  • Chemotherapy
  • Ex vivo
  • Neutropenia
  • PIXY321

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

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