Clinical implications of basic science discoveries: Induced pluripotent stem cell therapy in transplantation - A potential role for immunologic tolerance

J. A. Wertheim*, J. R. Leventhal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold the potential for future development of genetically identical tissues from almost any mature cell lineage. For clinical applications in cell therapy and transplantation, it may provide a means to one-day restore dysfunctional or damaged tissue without the need for immunosuppression. A recent study by de Almeida et al published in the journal Nature Communications indicates that iPSCs may indeed elicit an immune response that evolves as cells differentiate toward maturity to induce a state of tolerance within a recipient animal. If these early findings hold true, it suggests a possible explanation for self-recognition of mature cells derived from iPSCs for use in future therapeutic interventions in transplantation such as cellular therapy or tissue engineering. The authors review recent literature on immunogenicity of induced pluripotent stem cells and their mature progeny with future implications to cellular transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)887-890
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • basic (laboratory) research/science
  • cellular transplantation (non-islet)
  • immunobiology
  • regenerative medicine
  • stem cells
  • tissue injury and repair
  • tissue/organ engineering
  • tolerance
  • tolerance: mechanisms
  • translational research/science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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