Clinical implications of primary and nonprimary pathway contributions to the middle latency response generating system

Nina Kraus*, Therese McGee

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clinical use of the middle latency response (MLR) has been limited by the variability of the response during sleep in ung children. Theoretically, this variability can be explained by the differential maturation of the primary and nonprimary components of the MLR generating system. The model is supported by animal neurophysiological data. Applied to the human system, the model predicts that, in children, MLR generators are active only' during certain stages of sleep. From a clinical standpoint, this has led to a procedure for signaling the clinician when a child is in a sleep state favorable for recording the MLR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)36-48
Number of pages13
JournalEar and hearing
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Speech and Hearing

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