Clinical outcomes after laparoscopic antireflux surgery in patients with and without preoperative endoscopic esophagitis

Ketan M. Desai, Margaret M. Frisella, Nathaniel J. Soper*, D. Shibata, S. R. DeMeester, W. Rattner, T. M. Quinn, Jeffrey H. Peters

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

A wide spectrum of endoscopic findings exists in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This study compared clinical outcomes after laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) in patients who had GERD with and without preoperative endoscopic esophagitis. From 1992 to 2001, a total of 414 patients who underwent LARS with 6 months or more of follow-up were prospectively entered into a database. Among these patients, 84 (20%) had no endoscopic evidence of esophagitis on preoperative endoscopy (group 1), whereas 330 (80%) did have esophagitis (group 2). Perioperative outcomes, GERD symptom relief, and the use of acid-reducing medication were assessed. Preoperative DeMeester scores in groups 1 and 2 were 44 ± 29 and 61 ± 62 (P < 0.05) and mean esophageal peristaltic amplitude was 86 ± 32 mm Hg vs. 60 ± 42 mm Hg, respectively (P < 0.05). Although procedure time was significantly shorter in group 1, other perioperative outcomes were similar. At postoperative follow-up, the use of proton pump inhibitors was reduced in both groups (86% to ≤14%). With the exception of postoperative dysphagia, there was no difference in GERD symptom relief between groups 1 and 2. The presence or absence of preoperative esophagitis has minimal effect on favorable symptomatic outcomes after LARS. Thus LARS is an effective treatment option for patients, irrespective of endoscopic evidence of esophagitis, leading to excellent symptom relief and a marked reduction in the use of proton pump inhibitors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-52
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2003

Keywords

  • Esophagitis
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Laparoscopy
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Gastroenterology

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