Clinical Practice Patterns in Abdominoplasty: 16-Year Analysis of Continuous Certification Data from the American Board of Plastic Surgery

Michael J. Stein, Joshua P. Weissman, John Harrast, J. Peter Rubin, Arun K. Gosain, Alan Matarasso*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The authors evaluated trends in practice patterns for abdominoplasty based on a 16-year review of tracer data collected by the American Board of Plastic Surgery as part of the continuous certification process. Methods: To facilitate comparison of an equal number of patients over time, tracer data from 2005 to 2021 were split into an early cohort (EC) (from 2005 to 2014) and a recent cohort (RC) (from 2015 to 2021). Fisher exact tests and two-sample t tests were used to compare patient demographics, surgical techniques, and complication rates. Results: Data from 8990 abdominoplasties (EC, n = 4740; RC, n = 4250) were analyzed. RC abdominoplasties report a lower rate of complications (RC, 19%; EC, 22%; P < 0.001) and a lower rate of revision surgery (RC 8%; EC, 10%; P < 0.001). This has occurred despite the increased use of abdominal flap liposuction (RC, 25%; EC, 18%; P < 0.001). There has been a decline in the use of wide undermining (81% versus 75%; P < 0.001), vertical plication of the abdomen (89% versus 86%; P < 0.001), and surgical drains (93% versus 89%; P < 0.001). Abdominoplasty surgery is increasingly performed in an outpatient setting, with increased use of chemoprophylaxis for thrombosis prevention. Conclusions: Analysis of these American Board of Plastic Surgery tracer data highlights important trends in clinical practice over the past 16 years. Abdominoplasty continues to be a safe and effective procedure with similar complication and revision rates over the 16-year period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-74
Number of pages9
JournalPlastic and reconstructive surgery
Volume153
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2024

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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