Clinical presentation, management, and in-hospital outcomes of patients admitted with acute decompensated heart failure with preserved systolic function: A report from the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry (ADHERE) database

Clyde W. Yancy*, Margarita Lopatin, Lynne Warner Stevenson, Teresa De Marco, Gregg C. Fonarow

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

726 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aims of this analysis were to describe the clinical characteristics, management, and outcomes of patients hospitalized for acute decompensated heart failure (HF) with preserved systolic function (PSF). BACKGROUND: Clinically meaningful characteristics of these patients have not been fully studied in a large database. METHODS: Data from >100,000 hospitalizations from the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure National Registry (ADHERE) database were analyzed. RESULTS: Heart failure with PSF was present in 50.4% of patients with in-hospital assessment of left ventricular function. When compared with patients with systolic dysfunction, patients with PSF were more likely to be older, women, and hypertensive and less likely to have had a prior myocardial infarction or be receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker. In-hospital mortality was lower in patients with PSF compared with patients with systolic dysfunction (2.8% vs. 3.9%; adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 0.86; p = 0.005), but duration of intensive care unit stay and total hospital length of stay were similar. Serum creatinine >2 mg/dl was associated with increased in-hospital mortality in both systolic function groups (PSF: 4.8%; systolic dysfunction: 8.4%; p < 0.0001), and the most powerful predictors of in-hospital mortality in both groups were blood urea nitrogen >37 mg/dl (OR: 2.53; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.22 to 2.87) and systolic blood pressure ≤125 mm Hg (OR: 2.58; 95% CI: 2.33 to 2.86). CONCLUSIONS: Heart failure with PSF is common and is characterized by a unique patient profile. Event rates are worrisome and reflect a need for more effective management strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-84
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 3 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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