Clinical psychology PhD students' admission experiences: Implications for recruiting racial/ethnic minority and LGBTQ students

Loretta Hsueh*, Alexandra Werntz, Steven Hobaica, Sarah A. Owens, Mark A. Lumley, Jason J. Washburn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore differences in the clinical psychology PhD program admissions experience (i.e., interviewing and decision-making) by race/ethnicity and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) identity. Methods: Participants were 803 students (24% racial/ethnic minority; 19% LGBTQ) enrolled in US clinical psychology PhD programs. Two-group comparisons tested for differences in admission experiences by race/ethnicity and LGBTQ identity. Results: Racial/ethnic minority and LGBTQ students considered a programmatic commitment to diversity as more important in application decisions compared to non-Hispanic White and cisgender heterosexual students, respectively. LGBTQ students were more likely to be advised to not discuss personal information (e.g., sexual orientation) than cisgender heterosexual students. Racial/ethnic minority and LGBTQ students identified financial considerations and program outcomes as more important in their decision-making compared with non-Hispanic White and cisgender heterosexual students, respectively. Conclusion: Increasing funding and fostering authentic training environments should be prioritized in institutional conversations around recruiting racial/ethnic minority and LGBTQ trainees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • LGBTQ
  • admissions
  • applications
  • interviews
  • race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical psychology PhD students' admission experiences: Implications for recruiting racial/ethnic minority and LGBTQ students'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this