Clinical roundtable monograph: A multidisciplinary approach to the management of hepatocellular carcinoma

Robert G. Gish, Jorge A. Marrero, Al B Benson III

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer worldwide. The impact of this disease is great, as it is the third-leading cause of global cancer-related mortality. Traditionally, patients with HCC did not present until they were in late stages of the disease, limiting their therapeutic options. In recent years, improvements in disease awareness, as well as in surveillance and screening techniques, have led to earlier diagnosis and the potential for improved prognosis and patient survival. Some current treatments rely on surgical or locoregional techniques, many of which were not suitable for patients with advanced stage disease. In addition to surgical resection, advances in radiofrequency ablation and transarterial chemoembolization procedures have increased survival. However, these improvements are short-lived, requiring alternative therapies for patients with recurrent or advanced-stage HCC. Although conventional chemotherapeutic agents have traditionally been administered in this setting, their role in HCC is decreasing as advances in targeted therapies have proven successful in this disease. Notably, treatment with the multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib led to significant improvements in survival in phase III clinical studies, resulting in its approval for unresectable HCC. This clinical roundtable provides an overview of HCC, first focusing on the recognition of the disease. This overview is followed by an in-depth discussion of successful management of HCC using a multimodality approach. Techniques in surgical resection and locoregional therapy are described, as are the safety and efficacy of new systemic and targeted agents. Upon completion of this activity, physicians will have an improved understanding of the occurrence, diagnosis, and treatment of HCC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Advances in Hematology and Oncology
Volume8
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Survival
Therapeutics
Liver Neoplasms
Complementary Therapies
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Early Diagnosis
Physicians
Safety
Mortality
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

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title = "Clinical roundtable monograph: A multidisciplinary approach to the management of hepatocellular carcinoma",
abstract = "Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer worldwide. The impact of this disease is great, as it is the third-leading cause of global cancer-related mortality. Traditionally, patients with HCC did not present until they were in late stages of the disease, limiting their therapeutic options. In recent years, improvements in disease awareness, as well as in surveillance and screening techniques, have led to earlier diagnosis and the potential for improved prognosis and patient survival. Some current treatments rely on surgical or locoregional techniques, many of which were not suitable for patients with advanced stage disease. In addition to surgical resection, advances in radiofrequency ablation and transarterial chemoembolization procedures have increased survival. However, these improvements are short-lived, requiring alternative therapies for patients with recurrent or advanced-stage HCC. Although conventional chemotherapeutic agents have traditionally been administered in this setting, their role in HCC is decreasing as advances in targeted therapies have proven successful in this disease. Notably, treatment with the multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib led to significant improvements in survival in phase III clinical studies, resulting in its approval for unresectable HCC. This clinical roundtable provides an overview of HCC, first focusing on the recognition of the disease. This overview is followed by an in-depth discussion of successful management of HCC using a multimodality approach. Techniques in surgical resection and locoregional therapy are described, as are the safety and efficacy of new systemic and targeted agents. Upon completion of this activity, physicians will have an improved understanding of the occurrence, diagnosis, and treatment of HCC.",
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Clinical roundtable monograph : A multidisciplinary approach to the management of hepatocellular carcinoma. / Gish, Robert G.; Marrero, Jorge A.; Benson III, Al B.

In: Clinical Advances in Hematology and Oncology, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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