Closer to the theoretical limit: Spherical corrections to aplanatic solid immersion imaging with adaptive optics

Y. Lu*, E. Ramsay, C. R. Stockbridge, A. Yurt, F. H. Köklü, T. G. Bifano, M. S. Ünlü, B. B. Goldberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Aplanatic solid immersion lens (SIL) microscopy is required to achieve the highest possible resolution for next generation silicon IC backside inspection and failure analysis. However, aplanatic SILs are susceptible to spherical aberration introduced by substrate thickness mismatch. We have developed a wavefront precompensation technique using a MEMS deformable mirror and demonstrated an increase in substrate thickness tolerance in aplanatic SIL imaging. Good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved and spot intensity increases by at least a factor of two to three are demonstrated for thicknesses deviating several percent from ideal. This technique is also capable of fixing aberrations due to SIL fabrication, off-axis imaging and refractive index mismatch.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationISTFA 2012 - Conference Proceedings from the 38th International Symposium for Testing and Failure Analysis
PublisherASM International
Pages6-10
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781615039791
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Event38th International Symposium for Testing and Failure Analysis, ISTFA 2012 - Phoenix, AZ, United States
Duration: Nov 11 2012Nov 15 2012

Publication series

NameConference Proceedings from the International Symposium for Testing and Failure Analysis

Other

Other38th International Symposium for Testing and Failure Analysis, ISTFA 2012
CountryUnited States
CityPhoenix, AZ
Period11/11/1211/15/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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