Cognitive complexity and the effects of thought on attitude change

D. J. O'Keefe, R. M. Brady

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The attitudes of cognitively complex subjects were not more likely to polarize after thought. No differences between complex and noncomplex subjects were obtained with the original set, and with the replication set noncomplex subjects were more likely to polarize. Results suggest limitations on the generality of polarization.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-56
JournalSocial Behavior and Personality
Volume8
StatePublished - 1980

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