Cognitive disparities, lead plumbing, and water chemistry: Prior exposure to water-borne lead and intelligence test scores among World War Two U.S. Army enlistees

Joseph P. Ferrie*, Karen Rolf, Werner Troesken

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Higher prior exposure to water-borne lead among male World War Two U.S. Army enlistees was associated with lower intelligence test scores. Exposure was proxied by urban residence and the water pH levels of the cities where enlistees lived in 1930. Army General Classification Test scores were six points lower (nearly 1/3 standard deviation) where pH was 6 (so the water lead concentration for a given amount of lead piping was higher) than where pH was 7 (so the concentration was lower). This difference rose with time exposed. At this time, the dangers of exposure to lead in water were not widely known and lead was ubiquitous in water systems, so these results are not likely the effect of individuals selecting into locations with different levels of exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-111
Number of pages14
JournalEconomics and Human Biology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Keywords

  • Early-life conditions
  • IQ
  • Intelligence
  • Lead exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

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