Cognitive factors shape brain networks for auditory skills: Spotlight on auditory working memory

Nina Kraus*, Dana L. Strait, Alexandra Parbery-Clark

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

Musicians benefit from real-life advantages, such as a greater ability to hear speech in noise and to remember sounds, although the biological mechanisms driving such advantages remain undetermined. Furthermore, the extent to which these advantages are a consequence of musical training or innate characteristics that predispose a given individual to pursue music training is often debated. Here, we examine biological underpinnings of musicians' auditory advantages and the mediating role of auditory working memory. Results from our laboratory are presented within a framework that emphasizes auditory working memory as a major factor in the neural processing of sound. Within this framework, we provide evidence for music training as a contributing source of these abilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-107
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1252
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

Keywords

  • Auditory working memory
  • Brainstem
  • Experience-dependent plasticity
  • Hearing in noise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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