Cognitive impairment no dementia and associations with health literacy, self-management skills, and functional health status

Rebecca M. Lovett*, Laura M. Curtis, Stephen D. Persell, James W. Griffith, Derin Cobia, Alex Federman, Michael S. Wolf

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of cognitive impairment no dementia (CIND) among a diverse, community-based population, and establish associations between CIND and health literacy, chronic disease self-management and functional health status. Methods: 863 primary care adults without dementia aged 55–74. Adjusted logistic and linear regressions were used to assess associations between CIND (None, Mild, Moderate/Severe) and outcomes. Results: 36 % participants exhibited CIND. It was strongly associated with limited health literacy (Newest Vital Signs: Mild [OR 3.25; 95 % CI 1.93, 5.49], Moderate/Severe [OR 6.45; 95 % CI 3.16, 13.2]; Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults: Mild [OR 3.46; 95 % CI 2.08, 5.75], Moderate/Severe [OR 8.82; 95 % CI 4.87, 16.0]; all p's < 0.001) and poor chronic disease self-management (Mild [B = −11.2; 95 % CI −13.5, -8.90], Moderate/Severe CI [B = −21.0; 95 % CI −23.6, −18.4]; both p's < 0.001). Associations between CIND and functional health status were non-significant. Conclusions: CIND was prevalent in this cohort, and strongly associated with requisite skills for managing everyday health needs. Practice Implications: Attention to subtle declines in chronic disease self-care may assist with CIND identification and care management within this population. When CIND is observed, clinicians should also expect and address difficulties with self-management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1805-1811
Number of pages7
JournalPatient education and counseling
Volume103
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Chronic disease self-management
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Functional health status
  • Health literacy
  • Older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cognitive impairment no dementia and associations with health literacy, self-management skills, and functional health status'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this