Collagen crosslinking does not dictate stiffness in a transgenic mouse model of skeletal muscle fibrosis

Mark A. Chapman, Rajeswari Pichika, Richard L. Lieber*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Skeletal muscle fibrosis is characterized by increases in tissue stiffness and collagen content. However, a very weak correlation exists between collagen content and stiffness in skeletal muscle. Recently, it has been hypothesized that collagen crosslinking explains tissue stiffness in fibrotic skeletal muscle. Therefore, we addressed this hypothesis by correlating tissue stiffness with lysyl-pyridinoline, hydroxylysyl-pyridinoline, and pentosidine collagen crosslinks. Stepwise regression revealed that, separate or together, collagen crosslinks did not correlate with tissue stiffness. Our result demonstrates that increased tissue stiffness in skeletal muscle fibrosis is not simply explained by increased collagen crosslinks and/or collagen crosslink density. We suggest that collagen organization may affect tissue stiffness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-378
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 21 2015

Keywords

  • Collagen crosslinking
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Fibrosis
  • Mechanical properties
  • Muscle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Collagen crosslinking does not dictate stiffness in a transgenic mouse model of skeletal muscle fibrosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this