Community-acquired pneumonia: Pathophysiology and host factors with focus on possible new approaches to management of lower respiratory tract infections

Richard G. Wunderink, Grant W. Waterer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present understanding of the pathophysiology of community-acquire pneumonia (CAP) explains the mechanism for many specific manifestations, but does not address adequately why only some patients experience complications. Recent advances in understanding the genetics of complex illnesses offer hope for a more complete insight into the pathogenesis of CAP. This article reviews genetic variation in the molecules involved in the known pathogenic mechanisms of CAP, including cough, bacterial recognition, inflammation and the compensatory anti-inflammatory response, and organ dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-759
Number of pages17
JournalInfectious disease clinics of North America
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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