Community perspectives: Developing and implementing a smartphone intervention for latina breast cancer survivors in Chicago

Laura B. Oswald, Judy Guitelman, Diana Buitrago, Joanna Buscemi, Francisco Iacobelli, Alejandra Perez-Tamayo, Frank Penedo, Betina Yanez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Compared with non-Latina White breast cancer survivors (BCS), Latina BCS have poorer health-related quality of life and greater psychosocial needs. However, Latinas are less engaged in clinical research owing to barriers including less access to health-related information, less awareness of clinical trials, and practical barriers (e.g., competing time demands). Latina BCS are in need of educational and health-related resources that are culturally informed, scalable, and accessible. In 2015, the Chicago Cancer Health Equity Collaborative (ChicagoCHEC), a National Cancer Institute research collaborative, and ALAS-WINGS, a community organization providing educational and supportive resources to Latina BCS, partnered to develop My Guide. My Guide is a smartphone application-based intervention for Latina BCS designed to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This article summarizes the experiences of ChicagoCHEC and ALAS-WINGS throughout the community-engaged research (CEnR) partnership. Using existing relationships in community and academic settings via CEnR provides an ideal starting point for tailoring resources to Latina BCS and engaging Latina BCS in health-related research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-136
Number of pages6
JournalProgress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action
Volume13
Issue numberSpecial Issue 2019
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Breast neoplasms
  • Community health partnerships
  • Ehealth
  • Hispanic
  • Intervention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

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