Comparing awareness and distraction between desktop and peripheral-vision displays

Lindsay Reynolds*, Jeremy Birnholtz, Eli Luxenberg, Carl Gutwin, Maryam Mustafa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

We tested a peripheral-vision display to provide users with awareness of others and their level of interest in interaction in an experiment where participants had to be aware of a simulated workgroup during a visually-demanding primary task. Participants gathered more information from the peripheral-vision display although they attended to it significantly less often (less than half the number of glances, and less than a third of the total time spent looking). Our results suggest that the peripheral-vision space around the user is a valuable resource for awareness and communication systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI 2010 - The 28th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Conference Proceedings and Extended Abstracts
Pages3571-3576
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 9 2010
Event28th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2010 - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Apr 10 2010Apr 15 2010

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Other

Other28th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2010
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period4/10/104/15/10

Keywords

  • Awareness
  • Chat
  • Distributed workgroups
  • Instant messaging
  • Peripheral displays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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