Comparison between animal and human studies of skeletal muscle adaptation to chronic stimulation

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has recently emerged as a clinical tool for treatment of neuromuscular disorders. Chronic muscle stimulation, however, has long been used by basic scientists studying the details of the muscular adaptation process. Biochemical, morphological, and functional changes occur in skeletal muscle secondary to chronic stimulation. Chronic stimulation (12-24 hours per day for six weeks) results in a well-defined progression of changes in which a 'fast' muscle becomes a typical 'slow' muscle with a large decrease in force-generating capacity. On the other hand, clinical studies of FES have demonstrated muscle strengthening following treatment. An attempt is made to reconcile the results obtained in the two fields.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-24
Number of pages6
JournalClinical orthopaedics and related research
Issue number233
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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