Comparison of Gender Minority Stress and Resilience Among Transmasculine, Transfeminine, and Nonbinary Adolescents and Young Adults

Jonathan L. Poquiz*, Claire A. Coyne, Robert Garofalo, Diane Chen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined whether transmasculine, transfeminine, and nonbinary adolescents and young adults (AYA) experience different levels of gender minority stress and resilience. Methods: Demographic and clinical information were abstracted from medical charts from AYA initiating gender-affirming care. Group comparisons between transgender and nonbinary groups were examined using one-way analyses of variance and Tukey's honestly significant difference post hoc tests. Results: Participants were 638 transgender and nonbinary AYA (65.5% transmasculine, 24.6% transfeminine, and 9.9% nonbinary). Transmasculine and transfeminine AYA reported more discrimination (ps = .008 and .006, respectively) compared to non-binary AYA. Transfeminine and nonbinary AYA reported more negative future expectations (ps = .006 and .016, respectively) and pride (ps ≤ .001 and .032, respectively) than transmasculine AYA. Conclusions: Findings suggest that transmasculine, transfeminine, and nonbinary AYA experience different levels of gender minority stress and resilience. Future research is warranted to further examine between-group differences and differential impact on mental health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)615-618
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Adolescents and young adults
  • Minority stress
  • Nonbinary
  • Transgender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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