Comparison of subjective and objective measures of sedentary behavior using the Yale Physical Activity Survey and accelerometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

Abigail L. Gilbert, Jungwha Lee, Madeleine Ma, Pamela A. Semanik, Loretta Di Pietro, Dorothy D. Dunlop, Rowland W. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Sedentary behavior is associated with increased risk of functional decline and disability. Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) spend more time sedentary than healthy adults. Self-reported assessment of sedentary behavior has not been well-developed in this patient population. Methods: 172 adults with RA wore an accelerometer for 7 days and completed a modified version of the Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS). YPAS-derived sedentary estimates included 1) daily sitting categories (<3, 3 to 6, 6 to 8, >8 hours/day), 2) continuous daily sedentary time calculated by subtracting hours spent sleeping or in physical activity from a 24-hour day, and 3) rank order of YPAS-derived continuous daily sedentary time. Each estimate was compared with objective accelerometer-derived sedentary time using linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: A significant relationship was observed between accelerometer-derived sedentary time and all 3 estimates. Bland-Altman plot demonstrated systematic bias, however Bland-Altman plot of rank-order demonstrated that the ranked YPAS-derived continuous estimate was an unbiased predictor of ranked accelerometer sedentary time though limits of agreement were wide. Conclusions: This patient-reported approach using the YPAS shows promise to be a useful tool to identify the most sedentary patients. Providing a practical and accurate tool may increase the frequency sedentary behavior is assessed by clinicians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-376
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2016

Keywords

  • Accelerometry
  • Chronic disease
  • Clinical research
  • Instrument psychometrics
  • Measurement
  • Sedentary behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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