Comparison of two new rapid antigen detection assays for respiratory syncytial virus with another assay and shell vial culture

Xiaotian Zheng*, Susanne Quianzon, Yan Mu, Ben Z Katz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major viral pathogen causing lower respiratory tract infection in young children. Early detection allows cohorting of infected inpatients to prevent nosocomial transmission and consideration of treatment. To achieve rapid reporting, antigen detection has been widely used. Since late 2002, the FDA approved two new RSV antigen detection tests, the Now RSV test (Binax) and the Directigen EZ RSV (Becton Dickinson), both of which promised reduced hands-on processing. Objectives: Evaluate relative performance of the two new rapid antigen detection assays. Study design: To compare the performance of these newer tests with a previously existing antigen detection test (Becton Dickinson) and shell vial viral culture with clinical specimens. Results and conclusions: A total of 89 fresh respiratory specimens from 84 pediatric patients were tested. We also performed reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on all culture negative but antigen positive samples as well as 26 specimens that were negative on both shell vial culture and antigen testings. Overall, the three antigen assays performed similarly well. The hands-on processing for the two newer tests was significantly reduced, making them more convenient for rapid screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-133
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Virology
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

Keywords

  • Antigen detection
  • Culture
  • Respiratory syncytial virus
  • RT-PCR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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